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5 business uses of iPad (and Android tablets) powered by HyperOffice

So you can’t have enough of your iPad. You use it to browse the net, watch your favorite video, read the news (or a book), check the weather, tweet your opinions, find your way and slingshot Angry Birds. You’re basically inseparable.

Just when you thought you had seen all of iPad’s wonders, iPad’s power can now be extended to work as well. In Steve Job’s words, “there is an app for that” – and it is HyperOffice. Without further ado, here are some business things you can do with HyperOffice:

1. Share and work together on business documents

With HyperOffice you can store and organize your business documents online, together with permissions, version control, comments and more. Now you can use your iPad to access these documents. You can also use free third party WebDav tools to edit and work together on these documents with colleagues.

2. Manage corporate mail

HyperOffice is a corporate email service where you can set up dedicated email for your business – employees@yourcompany.com. You have two ways in which you can access this email on your iPad.

–  Use the HyperOffice web app to access email through an interface specially designed for your iPad.

–  Push corporate email to your native iPad email app. So as soon as an email arrives in your corporate inbox, it is instantly pushed down to your iPad email app.

3. Manage projects

HyperOffice’s web app allows you to use your iPad as a project management tool. You can manage all aspects of a team project – create projects, add tasks and activities, set dependencies, assign responsibilities, set timelines and priorities, attach resources – from a single interface.

4. Manage and share work schedules

You can also create group calendars that everyone on your team can see on their iPad. This ensures that everyone is on top of group schedules. You can also set up meetings and send out invites directly from the calendar console. You can even sync with your native iPad calendar and share events that you set up on your iPad calendar. So if you create an event on your iPad calendar, it with instantly show up on your teams’ iPad calendar as well – isn’t that cool?

5. Manage and share corporate contact lists

Like calendars, you can access and manage your corporate contacts, all categorized in groups and lists (HR, Marketing, important clients, partners – anything you like) right on your iPad. Your other team members have access to these contacts as well (provided they have the rights). Also, like calendars, you can sync these contacts with your native iPad address book, and share contacts with teammates.

So, what are you waiting for? Go extract productivity from your iPad! Find more information about the HyperOffice iPad app here.

Guess what’s coming soon…? Be Social (and productive) at work!

The moment of social business is here

It is a great moment in the history of social collaboration. The idea itself is not new. Much has been written over the last 2 years about what enterprise software can learn from the principles of “social” design of popular consumer tools like FaceBook and Twitter – the impact on user adoption, on information access, on time saving, on productivity, and indeed, on the fundamental structure of organizations.

There are also scores of solutions in the market which specialize in “social collaboration” – Yammer, Chatter, Podio, SocialText and so on.

However, the last 2 years can be best described as the early beginnings of the social business movement.  Experts were just starting to flirt with the idea and its implications, and only a handful of bold companies were implementing and experimenting with this new approach. Over the last 2 years, the movement has matured, gained strength, and is now at a cusp. Although not yet close to mainstream adoption, the approach has been tried, vetted, and oozes promise.

The shortcomings of social collaboration solutions today

However, “social collaboration” software today suffers from various shortcomings. Although they claim to be more than “Facebook for business”, most current social collaboration tools offer little more than thin networking and social messaging (or wall messaging) capabilities. This approach may be great for fostering cross organizational connections and communication, but is apparently not suited for structured business needs (project management, document management, scheduling). Other social collaboration tools see themselves as “glue”, where third party applications can be plugged on top of their social layer. However, the integration in this case is limited at best (because of the divergent agendas of the social collaboration vendor and third party), and importantly, the plugged-on applications have no inter-integration. In a true collaboration solution, every piece interacts with other pieces.

The problem of current social collaboration solutions, in our view, is a lack of collaboration depth.

On the other hand, traditional collaboration software providers like Google Apps (Google Plus is NOT a social collaboration app!) and Office 365, by virtue of their size, and their user bases and positions to defend, are understandably slow and cautious in making bold changes. For this reason they have not entered the social collaboration market in a bold way (Office 365 has some basic networking features).

Guess what’s coming soon?

At HyperOffice, we have the nimbleness of a startup, and more than 10 years of experience of developing collaboration software for SMBs. We have the goods to create a social collaboration software with substance.

And we are going to.

We are within weeks of launching new social capabilities to our HyperOffice Collaboration Suite.

While we are not revealing much at this point, the best way to describe the new features is that structured collaboration needs of businesses have been combined with the open, democratic design of social media tools. The following graphic is a good conceptual depiction:

If you want to be informed when we launch, please visit the following page, and reserve your spot on our invitation list. Don’t miss out!

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King Arthur on a Collaboration Horse

We have often seen King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table brandishing swords, lances and scary looking maces in their glorious battles. But how would you feel if you see them use mobile phones, laptops and collaboration software in their armory?

In the spirit of fun, we created a cute video of King Arthur and his Knights using HyperOffice’s collaboration tools to help with their conquests. What else would you get then but dragons with bewildered expressions when the knight pulls out his laptop? Or a horse snorting in astonishment  when a knight types out a message on his iPhone (did they have rules about riding and messaging at the same time back then?)?.

Please do check out the video and share it with others!

The Strategic Potential of Collaboration Software

Those who follow the HyperOffice blog know that in our last series of posts, we have been focusing on the business problem of collaboration, beyond a narrow technology focus.  “Collaboration” in its broad sense, is what every organization is ultimately involved in – people working together to achieve organizational goals. In our last post, the “three pillars of collaboration” we had emphasized that to be truly collaborative, organizations need to get 3 ducks in a row – policies/processes, technology and culture – rather than depending solely on technology.

But that is not to say that technology is completely subordinate to the other two “pillars of collaboration”. Quite often, technology creates previously unthinkable possibilities. To illustrate, before collaborative mobile and internet technologies – there was simply no way to keep field workers on the company’s information grid. But now employees can be kept on the grid wherever they are, which creates fantastic new opportunities in terms of how organizations can operate and structure themselves. This is an example of technology profoundly impacting the organizational bottom line.

In practice though, most often companies fall in the vicious cycle of stamping out immediate fires. Technology is approached similarly – a tool to share documents with so and so client, a sounding board for remote employees, a tool to collect information from website visitors. This approach however, ignores the true potential of collaboration software and leaves organizations with a rag tag of disorganized and disjoint tools (remember the problem of collaboration sprawl?). As that darling of manager types, Franklin Covey, reminds us, keeping on top of strategic goals is important to long term success, rather than getting caught in the whirlwind of everyday activities. Companies which are strategic, look beyond the myopia of the immediate, and create a framework for future success.

Collaboration software, because of its all-encompassing nature, needs to be seen in a similar strategic light. Here are the long term strategic possibilities that collaboration software creates:

Operate at greater scale: As Thomas Friedman told us in “the world is flat”, globalization and the internet have blown off our roof, knocked down our walls, and swiped out the floor from under our feet. The whole world is now a big market for talent and resources. This creates a massive potential for small and mid-sized organizations who now have access to the best talent and resources across the globe, at the most competitive rates, without the overheads of managing such a team in house. Collaboration software creates the framework within which such teams can be enabled with all the tools to work together and contribute.

Free organizational knowledge. Traditionally, organizational information has been scattered across multiple computers, servers, or email accounts – inaccessible exactly when needed. Collaboration software can be seen as an “organizational grid” where organizational information resides, and may freely be shared across the company network. This has a tremendous impact in terms of knowledge management where every document, record or any other information is readily available to employees exactly when needed.

Beyond that, collaboration software, especially cutting edge social collaboration software, encourages people to go beyond strict roles to contribute knowledge, and help each other out – a freeing up of knowledge trapped inside the minds of employees.

Engage customers and partners. Not only does collaboration software allow companies to extend to employees across the globe, it also allows companies to engage customers, partners and vendors like never before. Companies can even bring customers and partners right into their business flow. The result is happier, hence more loyal customers and partners, besides efficiencies in operations. To illustrate, a company may set up an extranet space for a customer project which involves external vendors. This is a place where everyone has a transparent view of project status, and can access information and contribute when their activities are due.

Streamline processes. Common processes relating to information may be served right through collaboration software – project management and delegation, document review, HR requests etc. Tools relating to specialized processes may be integrated right into the collaboration software using unified login or APIs.  Collaboration software therefore acts as a central hub for company processes. Not only is it simpler for employees to access everything in one place, it also breaks process silos, where processes may share the same information and have interactions.

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The 3 Pillars of Collaboration

Do you have a funny feeling that you seem to be doing the same work over and over in your office? Grand projects are initiated with a flurry of meetings and earth shaking intentions, but amnesia sets in as soon as everyone steps out of the conference room. Or responsibilities are handed from person to person like a baton in a relay race, with a loss in context at every step, till they end up in the lap of someone who has scarcely a clue about the original intentions. Or files sent back and forth, till they settle in an obscure corner of the business never to be found again. And you end up doing the same work over and over, burdened with an overwhelming sense of déjà vu, when the exact same issues are discussed yet again in a meeting.

I am certain this evokes pangs of personal experience from everyone.

Many organizations suffer from this malady of broken collaboration. Some much of the time, some part of the time, only a few none of the time.

Wouldn’t it be amazing if every project was realized systematically, graduating from inception to execution to fruition, without loss in time or resources or context? We would surely be so much more productive.

In spite of being a technology company, we are amongst the first to admit that technology is not the sole panacea for the solution. Technology can be the backbone to help you implement the right things, or even open hitherto unavailable possibilities, but it needs to have supporting pillars. The following are the key pillars of collaboration.

1. Processes and Policies. The management needs to clearly lay out how things will be done. Who is responsible for what? What is the chain of command? What are the workflows and information flows? What tools will be used? With these basics ill defined, responsibility cannot be affixed, nobody is quite sure how they are supposed to achieve things, scores of cracks are created through which information may fall, and everyone ends up working at cross purposes. Ambiguity is the greatest enemy of collaboration.

Processes need to have collaboration built into them. It goes without saying how much different departments (and further, everyone in the company) can benefit from each other. For example, Marketing and Sales interact with the market everyday, and have much valuable information for Product Development about user needs.  But this sharing doesn’t happen nearly enough.  Don’t expect Sales and Marketing to exchange information on a whim. They already have tons going on. Sharing therefore needs be built into the processes of Sales, Marketing, Product Development or any other department in the company.

Technology is part of the picture, as it implements in practice what is laid out by policy. In the above example, Sales and Marketing should be able to log user feedback, which is forwarded to Product Development and made part of product development cycles. Other examples are workers being encouraged to store documents not on their desktop, but in the shared documents repository where they are available to everyone else. Or making sure that the project management system is used to set up projects, assign responsibilities, and update progress, rather than projects being handed down by worth of mouth and email, so that everyone has visibility of ongoing projects.

Although many policies are implemented by technology, they precede technology, and ensure that everything aligns to organizational objectives.

2. Technology.  Much of the work done in modern organizations involves information flows. Technology, or specifically information technology manages these flows, and makes sure the right people have the right information at the right time. Technology is therefore a key pillar in collaboration. This also explains the huge success of collaboration software, which ensures that workers have access to the information they need to perform their jobs.

Technology can also open new avenues and possibilities which were unavailable before. For example mobile technologies ensure that workers can be productive even when they are at home or on the road. Or social collaboration tools which allow information to be displayed and shared in unprecedented democratic and viral ways which spurs collaboration like never before. Technology can therefore impact policies and processes, and even organizational objectives by opening new vistas.

3. Culture. Culture picks up where policies leave off. Not everything can be achieved through processes and policies, and may not even be desirable, as employees may feel stifled. Culture may be thought of as unspoken and unwritten policies, and yet an equally powerful tool for influencing behavior. A “collaborative culture” is a company where people are encouraged to step out of their formal work boundaries, and share information that may be of use to others. Collaboration is part of the DNA of such companies and employees are self-directing in their collaboration behavior, rather than being directed.

SMB Group’s recent study titled “2011 communication and collaboration study” surveying over 700 decision makers found that companies with a “collaborative culture” actually had better revenue outcomes.

Policies may help reinforce a collaborative culture. For example in the SMB Group study, companies which reward group achievement as opposed to individual achievement were said to have a “collaborative culture”.

Conclusion

It is obvious from the above that none of the three pillars really exists in isolation. They all influence and reinforce each other.  Companies which see collaboration as a desirable strategic outcome need to take this broader, multi pronged approach.

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How to Sync iPhone with Outlook

While it makes sense to take a strategic approach towards collaboration software, as a tool which will have far reaching effects on how a business operates, oftentimes, businesses opt for collaboration software in response to an immediate problem. This is a first of a series of informative articles we will feature on the HyperOffice blog that deal with common problems that businesses face,  and how they can be solved by HyperOffice as well as other solutions.

As iPhone becomes popular as a business tool, employees quite naturally want to be able to access and sync Outlook and iPhone mail, contacts and calendars. There are three main ways to get this done:

1. Wired sync using iTunes

2. Wireless sync using a web service like HyperOffice

3. Sync using an enterprise messaging server like Exchange

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Wired Sync Using iTunes.

1. This is applicable if you are an iTunes user. You need to follow the following steps.

2. Make sure the iTunes plugin is enabled in Outlook

3. Connect your iPhone to your computer

4. iTunes should open up automatically

5. You need to open the Info tab in iTunes, and select “Outlook” from the “sync contacts with:” and “sync calendars with:” drop down.

6. Click the “Sync” button

Limitations

– You need to connect your iPhone to your computer everytime you need to sync.

– It is only one-way sync, meaning your Outlook information will appear on your iPhone, but not vice versa.

– Although iTunes has a “sync email” option, it only syncs email settings and not messages. To sync email between iPhone and Outlook, you need to set up the same IMAP account on both.

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Using a web service like HyperOffice. (Recommended only if you are looking for a team, not personal solution)

If your SMB does not have, and can not afford an enterprising messaging server like Exchange, a web service like HyperOffice is the ideal option. HyperOffice is a cloud based service that syncs with both Outlook and iPhone, and hence acts as a bridge that allows bi-directional sync between Outlook and iPhone. This offers a number of benefits. Firstly, you don’t need to install any dedicated servers or software. Secondly, you are not tethered to a single computer, and your information is synched wirelessly over the air in real time even when you are travelling. Plus, HyperOffice also includes support for a wide range of other device, and allows you to sync Outlook with devices like BlackBerry, Android, and Nokia etc. You need to take the following steps:

1. Sign up online for HyperOffice and log in

2. Set up synching between HyperOffice and Outlook using the HyperShare add-in.

3. Go to the “Settings” tab, and then “Mobile Sync”

4. Click Setup Phone, and Select the manufacturer, model & carrier from and enter phone number. Click continue.

5. In this step, enter code received on your mobile device and click on verify.

6. On the next screen, select data items to sync.

7. Once HyperOffice is set up, you now need to set up your iPhone. First you click on settings on your iPhone and scroll down & tap Mail, Contacts, Calendars.

8. Tap Add Account & select Microsoft Exchange as the type of account.

9. Enter HyperOffice email address and the password.

10. In the new server field enter hypersync.hyperoffice.com and hit next and select the services (Mail, Contacts, Calendars) you wish to sync.

Read more, or contact us for more information..

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Using an Enterprise Messaging Server like Microsoft Exchange

This option is applicable if you have Microsoft Exchange (2003, 2007, 2010) set up at your company, and powering Outlook. iPhone syncs with Exchange through the ActiveSync protocol. You need to take the following steps:

1. Set up your Outlook account using Exchange

2. On your iPhone screen, click “settings”

3. Click on mail, contacts, calendars

4. Click on “add account” and select “Exchange”

5. On the next screen, fill out your Email, Domain, Username, Password, and Description.

6. If auto-discovery is enabled in Exchange, the next screen will be automatically prepopulated. If not, you need to fill out the server information, and click next.

7. Now iPhone displays a list of data types you want to sync – mail, contacts and calendars. Click on “save” to complete the process.

Limitations

– You need to have Exchange Server installed, which is typically an enterprise product costing up to thousands of dollars. This is not an optimal solution for SMBs.

– If you want to extend syncing capabilities beyond iPhone, Exchange does not support non ActiveSync devices.

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Active Directory and the Cloud

Active Directory is a directory service widely used in organizations to implement policy controls and manage access to company IT resources.  It simplifies things for administrators as well as users by centralizing creation of usernames and passwords. Administrators are saved the effort of setting up usernames and passwords for every person for every computer, software and piece of information; and keeping these policy controls updated. On the other hand users can use the same login credentials to access all the network resources relevant to them.

However, things have changed in the era of cloud software. Employees need access not just to systems and information within the company network, but also to numerous cloud solutions which are hosted on the servers of the solution vendor.

However, the need for integration with Active Directory is as pertinent today as it ever was. Now that many business critical on-premise software are now moving to the cloud – email, accounting, collaboration, CRM etc – managing usernames, passwords and policies for each of these systems separately is highly inefficient. And the more cloud systems a company implements, the greater the number of users, the harder it is for administrators.

Since cloud based software have found wide acceptance in businesses only in the last couple of years, it is only now that vendors are considering advanced technical requirements such as integration between Active Directory and their cloud software.

At HyperOffice, we are fully appreciative this requirement, especially given the strategic nature of our collaboration software. We conduct on-demand Active Directory integrations based on the specific needs of our users. We have developed special tools, which let us do anything from simple Active Directory integrations, to highly customized integrations which meet enhanced security requirements, or let administrators trigger specific actions within HyperOffice right from Active Directory.

We just put out a white paper discussing in detail the relevance of Active Directory to the cloud, and presenting HyperOffice as a case study of the various degrees of integration between Active Directory and cloud software.

You can read it at “Active Directory and the Cloud”.

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HyperOffice is an iCloud alternative for team collaboration

iCloud is great news

iCloud is great news for the cloud industry as a whole. As everyone knows, the genius of Steve Jobs is to show everyone the importance of “sexy” in technology (for lack of a better word) – take an existing technology, and make it so compelling, so beautiful, that people can’t wait to lay their hands on that sleek shiny new thing.  He did that with iPhone, and repeated it with iPad.

The same could well happen with iCloud. The cloud has been around in the consumer market for more than a decade, and the business world has finally embraced it in the last couple of years. But Steve Jobs’ visibility and marketing genius could make the “cloud” meme so commonplace, that no cloud vendor ever has to lose hair again trying to explain to a prospect what the cloud is.

However, iCloud is not a team tool, nor is it intended to be.

iCloud is not for collaboration

Firstly, iCloud is designed as a personal data management tool. You have a personal account, which you use to access data across the iPhone, iPad and Mac. It simply has no “sharing” or “groupware” functionality.

Secondly, iCloud is not a traditional “cloud” solution. It has no web-browser access option, which is the cornerstone of most cloud solutions. All data (music, mail, apps) must be accessed on local applications on the iPhone, iPad or the Mac desktop. Therefore, in effect, the cloud is invisible in the background, and it pushes and synchronizes data between local applications. It has been argued that this model is simply not suitable for collaboration, which is more about everyone accessing a common instance of data on the cloud and working on it. In the “sync” model, an instance of the data is pushed locally, and changes synced back to the master copy on the cloud. The more the number of users working on that bit of data, the more complex the situation is.

Thirdly, iCloud restricts users to the Apple ecosystem. It effectively excludes users who prefer to have online access to their data, access it on their PC, or want to access it on one of the myriad mobile devices around in addition to iPhone and iPad.

HyperOffice lets you collaborate on Apple devices

However, quite undeniably, there is a segment of users and businesses who work primarily in the Apple environment, and want a solution that will let them share data in the Apple ecosystem. At HyperOffice, we have made a constant attempt to make our solutions compatible with an ever larger number of popular business environments. We have kept a constant eye on various Apple devices as they have gained importance in the businesses world, and continued to add support.

HyperOffice is the ideal solution for businesses looking to access and share corporate email, contacts, calendars and other information across their iPhone, iPad and Mac devices, and beyond.

Here is how HyperOffice supports each of these devices:

iPhone: HyperOffice support all mobile devices based on ActiveSync. This means iPhone users can push and wirelessly sync their business email, contacts and calendars on their devices. Since HyperOffice is a team solution, users can even share iPhone contacts and calendars with other team members. Anytime you create a meeting or edit a contact, you can choose to let everyone in your team know immediately.

Plus, HyperOffice is optimized for access from the iPhone Chrome browser. Users can access advanced HyperOffice collaboration software tools like shared documents, projects, forums, and workspaces right from their iPhone.

iPad: In addition to iPhone, HyperOffice also supports synching with the native mail, contact and calendar apps just like iCloud. Only, you can even share this information with team members. Besides, users can access HyperOffice features from their iPad Chrome browser.

Mac: HyperOffice allows synching with the native mail, contacts and calendars of Mac using a third party tool called SyncJE. Entourage in turn, is designed to automatically synchronize with these native Mac apps. In effect, Mac users can access their corporate mail, calendars and contacts from the native apps of Mac or entourage, and keep them in sync across devices.

Beyond Apple: Unlike iCloud, HyperOffice by no means restricts users to sharing and collaborating on information only in the Mac universe. All of HyperOffice’s features can be accessed from any PC or Mac web browser in the world. Support for mobile devices is also not restricted to iPhone and iPad, and fully extends to phones like Android, Nokia, Windows Mobile and even BlackBerry. Plus, people who are addicted to Outlook, may continue to use Outlook to access and share mail, contacts, calendars and tasks using our Outlook synchronization functionality.

So, if you are a Apple die hard, and looking to fully leverage your shiny Apple gadget to collaborate with teams, do hit us up.

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HyperSync is now HyperMobile!

Given the growing importance of mobility in HyperOffice capabilities, we thought it was time to give our mobile sync services a slight image makeover. So what you have hitherto affectionately referred to as HyperSync, gets the crisp, all-new, and descriptive title of HyperMobile. The same beloved product, but in new garb. There are a couple of reasons for the change:

HyperSync had the potential of being confused with the other “sync” services HyperOffice provides, namely, Outlook synchronization and the ability to sync with Mac mail and contacts. We felt that “HyperMobile” was a lot more descriptive, in that it makes clear the mobile specific capabilities of HyperOffice.

This is a great opportunity to re-emphasize our commitment to support an ever greater range of “mobile” features, and help popularize the concept of “mobile collaboration”. Mobile collaboration does not refer merely to the ability to collaborate on mobile phones, but reflects the emergence of new age devices – mobile phones, tablets, netbooks – and workers’ desire to access and collaborate on business information independent of device. Workers want to instantly collaborate and access information across all these devices depending on where they are – at office, at home, at a client site or on the road – without being tied to a single one. That is the spirit of “mobile collaboration”.

HyperMobile already offers powerful mobility features  including the ability to push and sync mail, contacts, calendars and tasks on their devices; share this information with colleagues; push information from third party sources like Gmail, Yahoo mail, and Hotmail ; and support for most major mobile devices. We plan to keep building on these capabilities and exciting new mobility features form a prominent part of our product roadmap. Keep following us to keep updated!

Email Archiving and SMBs

“Email archiving” wouldn’t normally ring a bell for a small business owner. The general impression is that the regulatory requirement of keeping all company email records for a certain number of years, falls only on enterprises, and hence the inapplicability of email archiving software to smaller businesses.

This is not totally accurate, since there are certain categories of small businesses, which are affected. There are thousands of small companies in the financial sector, for example, that are affected by regulations such as Sarbanes-Oxley, SEC and National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD).

But the general indifference of SB owners towards email archiving does not come as a surprise, given the price points, which more than outweighed any benefits. It typically involved purchasing and implementing specialized software like MS Exchange, and setting up dedicated servers – running up costs from hundreds to thousands of dollars.

However, thanks to the cloud revolution, email archiving is another area that has moved to the cloud. Companies can now access email archiving tools over the internet for a reasonable monthly fee, without the need to host solutions in-house. Given this substantially reduced price point, small business owners would do well to consider the benefits. Specifically, the benefits are as follows:-

1) Safeguard Mission Critical Data. It is not an overstatement to say that information that is critical to any businesses – client communications, documents, records, contracts, invoices – flow through its email system. Often, this information is lost or locked away in individual inboxes, frustratingly inaccessible when needed the most, and hostage to a fickle email system or a disgruntled employee on his way out. Email archiving ensures that all this information is stored, backed-up and safeguarded centrally on an ongoing basis.

2) eDiscovery. Email archiving solutions have search and discovery tools built into them to ensure that companies have access to the specific information they need, when they need it.

3) Legal Concerns. Although a large majority of small businesses are not required by law to store and conserve their business email communications, they may find themselves in a messy litigation, and required to produce historical email records under a subpoena. At other times, the presence of historical email records may help the small businesses owner in building a case in litigation against, say, a defaulting partner.

4) HR Benefits. The HR department may find email archiving to be an invaluable tool at their disposal, and a protection against staff email misuse. Numerous situations can be thought of to exemplify this – an in house investigation, monitoring for workplace harassment, or arbitration of employee tribunal cases before going to court.

Given the above benefits, small businesses may want to give email archiving a long and hard thought.

At HyperOffice, we constantly look to bring more and more features and functionality into our messaging and collaboration suite, to ensure that our customers don’t have to shop around as their needs expand. After expanding our email/messaging capabilities with push email support for almost every major mobile platform a few months ago, email archiving was the logical next step. Email archiving is currently in beta, and we hope to make it widely available very soon.